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Animal Rights

“If I am to be a voice for animals, then how should I speak?
Am I to whisper, when they are screaming in pain?
Am I to be calm, when they tremble in fear?

Am I to shout for mercy, as their throats are being slit?
Tell me how I need to speak, for you to grant them their freedom.”
~ Davegan Raza ~

What do you mean by “animal rights”?

Animal rights means that animals deserve certain kinds of consideration – consideration of what is in their best interests, regardless of whether they are “cute,” useful to humans, or an endangered species. It means recognizing that animals are not ours to use – for food, clothing, entertainment, or experimentation.

The question is not ‘Can they reason?’ nor ‘Can they talk?’ but ‘Can they suffer?

People often ask if animals should have rights, the answer is “Yes!” Animals deserve to live their lives free from suffering and exploitation.

The capacity for suffering is not just another characteristic like the capacity for language or higher mathematics. All animals have the ability to suffer in the same way and to the same degree that humans do. They feel pain, pleasure, fear, frustration, loneliness, and motherly love. Whenever we consider doing something that would interfere with their needs, we are morally obligated to take them into account.

When we suffer, we suffer as equals.
And in their capacity to suffer, a dog is a pig is a bear. . . . . . is a boy.

Every creature with a will to live has a right to live free from pain and suffering. Animal rights is not just a philosophy—it is a social movement that challenges society’s traditional view that all nonhuman animals exist solely for human use.

Only prejudice allows us to deny others the rights that we expect to have for ourselves. Whether it’s based on race, gender, sexual orientation, or species, prejudice is morally unacceptable.

If you wouldn’t eat a dog, why eat a pig? Dogs and pigs have the same capacity to feel pain, but it is prejudice based on species that allows us to think of one animal as a companion and the other as dinner.

Animals must be off the menu because tonight they are screaming in terror in the slaughterhouse, in crates, and cages.

King Lear, late at night on the cliffs asks the blind Earl of Gloucester “How do you see the world?” And the blind man Gloucester replies “I see it feelingly”. Shouldn’t we all?

  • CO2, Methane, and Nitrous Oxide from the livestock industry are killing our oceans. 90% of small fish are ground into pellets to feed livestock.
  • The oceans are dying in our time. By 2048 all our fisheries will be dead. The lungs and the arteries of the earth.
  • Billions of bouncy little chicks are ground up alive simply because they are male.
  • Only 100 billion people have ever lived. 7 billion alive today. And we torture and kill 2 billion animals every week. 10,000 entire species are wiped out every year because of the actions of one species.

We are now facing the 6th mass extinction in cosmological history. If any other organism did this a biologist would call it a virus. It is a crime against humanity of unimaginable proportions

.- Extract from ‘Animals Should Be Off The Menu’ debate by Philip Wollen

Activist’s Pledge

Until the last flesh is consumed
and no more animals are born to doom
Our struggle is beside the weak
respect for life is what we seek

Until the last is forced to entertain
and no more animals are driven insane
For all those beaten to a cower
we lend our strength and our power

Until the last suffers in a cruel test
and scientific fraud is finally confessed
To those voiceless we give them word
until their agonizing cries are heard

Until the last dead skin is worn
and for our usage no animal is born
Relentless battles we must fight
until all others see compassion’s light

Until the last abuse has ceased
and existence is granted to every beast
We won’t abandon or give in
because this war we intend to win

by Janet Riddle

Close all slaughterhouses

It is not
‘Can they reason?’

Nor
‘Can they talk?’

But
‘Can they suffer?’