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99 hours of hell – filmed by Liz Carter

Namika’s Wave

A ‘superpod’ of around 300 dolphins were driven into The Cove in Taiji, Japan, corralled off and trapped by nets. Nearly 100 bottlenose dolphins, mostly juveniles, were taken over a five day period and forced into captivity. Those that remained were driven away, exhausted and swimming slowly after their ordeal.

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Captive selection of super pod of bottlenose dolphins driven into Taiji, Japan 20th January for 5 days of selection -24th January 2017 100 dolphins were stolen, some died from the process
juveniles ripped from their mothers,this scene, the mother and child are desparately trying to stay together..
Your entertainment has been stolen from the wild ..destined for marine parks and aquariums..stop supporting swim with dolphins , marine parks that hold,captive dolphins ..filmed today in Taiji, Japan , watch the Cove movie to learn more about dolphin captivity .. the price of a ticket and a day trip out to a marine park isn’t worth this #superpod #broome #lovebroome #IMATA #taiji #tokyo2020

Posted by Liz Carter on Saturday, 21 January 2017

MVI_3536Posted by Liz Carter on Thursday, 19 January 2017

MVI_4040Posted by Liz Carter on Friday, 20 January 2017

Liz Carter captured heartbreaking footage of a young dolphin being taken away from its pod in Japan.
“The dolphins were so panicked, they were diving in amongst each other. It was like being in a spa with bubbles going – the water was just thrashing around that much, it was just horrible.”

Liz states that the mother can be seen swimming near the juvenile as it struggles in the grasp of the divers.

“I just knew it was her, she was already just following her. And I just thought this is so horrible, this is so horrific – it’s like someone taking my own child off me, I had to cut the video because I was crying. It was just so awful watching that – that mother wouldn’t recover. It was horrible to see them, fighting so hard to stay together.”

“I actually named the dolphin. I named the baby Namika, which means flower waves. To me that morning she was just like this delicate little flower, riding the waves with her family and her mother for the last time until they were driven in, and that was it.”

MVI_4547Posted by Liz Carter on Friday, 20 January 2017

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Posted by Liz Carter on Saturday, 21 January 2017

MVI_4960Posted by Liz Carter on Saturday, 21 January 2017

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Posted by Liz Carter on Saturday, 21 January 2017

fighting dolphinPosted by Liz Carter on Sunday, 22 January 2017

Posted by Liz Carter on Thursday, 26 January 2017

“Thank you everyone for continuing to share this families story .. this young dolphin represents this families entire existence and demonstrates to the world in 30 seconds why attending captive dolphin facilities is just all wrong . As soon as a story hits social media it can vanish as quick as it arrived. For this superpod driven into Taiji we must continue to share their story.

A few days ago I gave this young dolphin a name, I named this young dolphin Namika, it means Flower Wave. On Friday 20th January 2017 this delicate young flower, Namika, was riding waves with her family, alongside her mother .. Namika with her 250-300 strong family unit were then stolen from their freedom and found themselves netted in the cove. Sunday 22nd January 2017, Namika was horribly and forcibly separated from her mother, their struggle and desperation to remain together has not gone unnoticed in the world. We must continue to be Namika’s voice, her story represents all the captive dolphins around the world , her story must continue to be told around the world .. let’s stand united and continue to share Namika’s story let’s all never forget Namika and all those trapped in marine parks around the world. Let’s continue to educate people to take the pledge and stop supporting marine parks. Please Join in everyone and continue to be #NamikasVoice and tell #NamikasStory #United4Namika #NamikasCourage #NamikasWave .. Let’s get Namika trending if we can .. thanks for supporting this family and sharing their story.
Thank you”
– Liz Carter

Film Credits: Camera: Sea Shepherd Cove Guardians : Liz Carter : Ric O’Barry’s Dolphin Project : Yoshi’s Project
Video Editing : Albi Deak